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Jennifer Lee: Ten Pots

6 - 29 October 2021

Erskine, Hall & Coe are delighted to announce our forthcoming exhibition of work by Jennifer Lee.

The main focus of the exhibition will be ten outstanding, new hand-built vessels and bowls for which Lee is internationally famous. It will also include seven thrown pots, made in Japan and London, accompanied by a number of drawings.

It has been a remarkable five years for Lee since her last exhibition of new work at Erskine, Hall & Coe in 2016.

Kettle’s Yard, Cambridge held a highly acclaimed solo exhibition in 2019, Jennifer Lee: the potter’s space. This was her first solo exhibition in a UK public gallery since 1994. She concurrently curated a display in the nearby Fitzwilliam Museum, Jennifer Lee: A personal selection.

Lee was a guest artist in residence at The Shigaraki Ceramic Cultural Park, Japan in 2018, and in Mashiko, Japan the following year.

In Her Majesty the Queen’s New Year 2021 Honours List, Lee was awarded an OBE, Officer of the Order of the British Empire, for services to ceramics.

In 2018, she was the recipient of the LOEWE Foundation Craft Prize. Announcing Lee as the winner, Jonathan Anderson, Creative Director of LOEWE, stated “Jennifer Lee for me is a landmark in form.”

The roots of Lee’s hand-building process lie in ancient methods of pinching and coiling. Her vessels are distinguished by her unique colouring method of mixing mineral oxides into the clay before making.

In 2019, Erskine, Hall & Coe held an exhibition of her works dating from 1990 to 2011, with vessels from this exhibition entering the collections of the Hepworth Wakefield and the National Museum of Wales.

Currently fifty international public collections, including The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, The British Museum in London, the National Museum in Stockholm and The Museum of Contemporary Ceramic Art in Shigaraki, have work by Lee in their permanent collections.

A catalogue accompanying our exhibition will include an essay by Robin Vousden.